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Progressive Dairy Magazine Features Dr. Ryan Leiterman’s Article “4 Air Exchanges Per Hour: A History of Calf Barn Ventilation”

Dr. Ryan Leiterman recently contributed to Progressive Dairy Magazine with his article “4 Air Exchanges Per Hour:  A History of Calf Barn Ventilation and an Industry That Is Slow To Change.”  

Click here to view in Progressive Dairy:  https://www.progressivedairy.com/topics/calves-heifers/4-air-exchanges-per-hour-a-history-of-calf-barn-ventilation-and-an-industry-that-is-slow-to-change

Click here to view the Canadian Issue:

https://www.progressivedairycanada.com/topics/facilities-equipment/4-air-exchanges-per-hour-a-history-of-calf-barn-ventilation-and-an-industry-that-is-slow-to-change

 

 

Inoc-U-Lock™ : Preserving Forages And Protecting Your Hard Work

Click here to view as a pdf:  Inoc-U-Lock: Preserving Forages And Protecting Your Hard Work

By Teresa Marker, B.S.

Feeding high-quality forage to livestock can help improve animal performance, health and producer profitability. Properly inoculating livestock feedstuffs with an inoculant that provides complete and controlled fermentation is key. The Crystal Creek® product Inoc-U-Lock provides many benefits such as reduced dry matter loss, improved nutrient retention (protein and energy) during storage, improved aerobic stability and a reduced risk of heating in the bunk. A properly fermented feed preserves the quality of the forage that is harvested and can ultimately result in increased milk production and improved animal health.

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Four Air Exchanges Per Hour: A History Of Calf Barn Ventilation And An Industry That Is Slow To Change

Click here to view as a pdf:  Four Air Exchanges Per Hour: A History Of Calf Barn Ventilation And An Industry That Is Slow To Change

By Ryan Leiterman, D.V.M
Director of Technical Services

When discussing calf barn ventilation, invariably the topic of using four air exchanges per hour for cold weather ventilation will come up. After all, we wouldn’t want “too much” of that cold air in the barn. Or would we? Who came up with the idea to use four air exchanges per hour during cold weather and why? To understand our industry’s current ventilation recommendations, we must first understand the history of calf barn ventilation research.

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Cold Weather Considerations For Calves

Click here to view as a pdf:  Cold Weather Considerations For Calves

When temperatures start to drop, calf raisers need to make accommodations to ensure calves have the resources necessary to maintain their body temperature, support basic bodily functions and develop into productive, profitable, young stock. Two general areas to consider when preparing your calves for winter months are diet/nutrition and housing.

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The Recovery Period: Tips For A Successful Dry Off

Click here to view as a pdf:  The Recovery Period: Tips For A Successful Dry Off

By Erik Brettingen, B.S.

The dry cow period is arguably the most important time in the cow’s lactation cycle as it is the time in which the cow rests her body and prepares for the next lactation. The timing and way in which a cow is dried off can greatly impact how well she will transition into the dry period and how well she will come into her next lactation. A properly managed dry off protocol should minimize the risk of mastitis, maximize cow comfort and allow for mammary tissue rest and recovery in preparation for the next lactation.

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Maximizing Equine Reproductive Performance: The Impact Of Biosecurity And Disinfection

Click here to view as a pdf:  Maximizing Equine Reproductive Performance: The Impact of Biosecurity And Disinfection

By Alex Austin, B.S.

The goal of any biosecurity protocol should be to reduce the frequency and severity of disease. Equine infectious diseases can cause health and performance issues, increased treatment expense and potential risks to human health. Horse owners with breeding facilities are encouraged to refer to the American Association of Equine Practitioners’ guidelines for in-depth information on equine disease prevention and control. Equine reproductive infections can be costly; resulting in abortions, re-breedings and chronic reproductive issues where mares may not settle or stallions spread disease from farm to farm.

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