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Pregnancy Toxemia In Goats

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By Teresa Marker, B.S.

Farmers consistently look for ways to be more efficient with time, money and resources. Hidden profit thieves in dairy operations can have a tremendous impact on a farmer’s bottom line. One hidden profit thief in dairy goat operations is pregnancy toxemia. This metabolic disorder is present in approximately 13% of does and has a herd prevalence of over 87%.1

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Ask the Vet/Ask the Nutritionist

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“There are times we need to drench our calves or adult cows but no one on the farm is comfortable performing this procedure.  Are there any tips that could help us?”

-Unsure in Iowa-

There are many reasons for having to administer a liquid by mouth into the rumen or abomasum of an animal. Supplying the correct quantity of colostrum to calves or giving an electrolyte solution for rehydration are a couple common examples. Making sure that drenching is being performed correctly on your farm is crucial, as incorrect drenching can cause aspiration of fluids into the lungs leading to pneumonia, choking and even death. Training livestock handlers on the procedure will help set up your operation for success. Drenching requires skill, knowledge, strength, patience and the right tools for the job.

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Winter Tips For Livestock

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With winter fast approaching, it is time to prepare your livestock for the upcoming cold season. The following tips can help maximize the performance of your animals this winter:

Proper Feeding

The main goal of feeding in the winter is to maintain body condition and, in pregnant animals, provide adequate nutrition for the growing fetus. Cattle require 1% more energy from their diet for every degree that is below their (environmental) critical temperature.1 For beef cattle with a heavy, dry, winter coat, their (environmental) critical temperature is 19˚ F. The chart below demonstrates the relationship between temperature and energy needs.

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Cost vs. Value: Why Cheaper Is Not Always Better

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By Erik Brettingen, B.S.

With the large selection of products available to the farming community, knowing what is needed, what isn’t, and which product to buy can be difficult to sort out. Cost often plays a role in making the selection between different products and services. While cost is important to consider, looking at a product’s value is a wiser approach to efficient decision making.

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Ask The Vet / Ask The Nutritionist

Click here to view as a pdf:  Ask The Vet Ask The Nutritionist

“I would like to test some feed stuffs with Dairyland Labs.  Which test package do you recommend?”

-Wondering in Wisconsin-

Crystal Creek® recommends the Select Package. The Select Package (listed as N7 NIR Select on the Dairyland Labs Submission form) is recommended over the Basic Package because its analysis offers an evaluation of ash, TDN and NE values, where the Basic Package does not. Crystal Creek® considers these values essential for balancing a ration.

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Interpreting Key Values Of A Forage Test

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By Alex Austin, B.S.

Forage testing gives great insight into the quality and value of feedstuffs. Testing allows for a better understanding of the forage value, whether feeding it out or looking to sell. Understanding key feed test values can give a producer insight on how their current agronomy, harvesting and storage management plan is working.

 

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Spring Pasture: A Great Asset

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By Erik Brettingen, B.S.

The spring flush of pasture is a great resource for producer profitability, animal health, and productivity. While pasture can provide a great deal of opportunity as an economical feed source, it is important to ensure the proper management of this resource. Waiting until the forage is adequately established before allowing grazing and keeping up with the fast growing flush, is critical to maintaining pasture health. Taking steps to prevent common pasture diseases like bloat and grass tetany will allow grazing animals to thrive on the new spring grass.

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Forage Sampling

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By Alex Austin, B.S.

It is important to sample forages before adding them to a livestock diet. Sampling allows producers to have a balanced ration for their livestock and test for mycotoxins. It also gives farmers a snapshot into their agronomy, harvesting and storage practices. The results of a forage sample will only be as good as the technique and effort that went in to obtaining it.

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Anti-Nutritional Trends And Thoughts With 2017 Feeds Across The Midwest

Click here to view as a pdf: Anti Nutritional Trends And Thoughts

By  Dr. John Goeser, Phd, PAS & Dipl. ACAN-Rock River Laboratory, Inc.

Contributing Editor

Historically, mold, yeast and mycotoxins are thought of as the primary contaminants in feed that rob high performing dairy cattle of health and nutrition. More recently, stress and pathogenic bacteria have been better recognized as contributing factors that interact with fungal and mycotoxin contaminants. See Figure 1.

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